Channeling resources to local organizations led by and working alongside women refugees and IDPs

The WPHF Funding Initiative on Forced Displacement

The WPHF Funding Initiative on Forced Displacement promotes the participation and leadership of displaced women and girls in socio-economic and political decision-making.

This Funding Initiative is part of WPHF’s regular funding cycle and currently implemented in 8 countries (Colombia, Nigeria, Yemen, Bangladesh, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan) with an initial investment of 12 Million EUR by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). WPHF seeks to fund local civil society organizations and projects led by and working alongside forcibly displaced women that are high impact, innovative and contribute directly to the following objectives:

  1. Promote improved socio-economic recovery and political participation of displaced women and girls in peacebuilding contexts;
  2. Reinforce the institutional capacity of civil society organizations working with women and girls in forced displacement.

This Funding Initiative makes available financing for local civil society organizations through two primary funding streams:

  • Programmatic funding from 30,000 USD to 200,000 USD: To finance programmatic activities by civil society organizations contributing to enhanced socio-economic recovery and the political participation of women and girls in peacebuilding settings (aligned with WPHF impact area 6).
  • Institutional funding from 2,500 USD to 30,000 USD: To provide institutional financing to local civil society organizations working with women and girls in forced displacement, aiming to reinforce the institutional capacity of their organizations (aligned with WPHF impact area 1).

 

We are currently accepting funding proposals from local civil-society organizations in Iraq and have previously accepted proposals in the following countries: Colombia, Nigeria, Yemen, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan. Find out more about the current and past Calls for Proposals of the WPHF Funding Initiative on Forced Displacement:

UKRAINE REGIONAL RESPONSE CFP: CLOSED BANGLADESH CFP - ROUND 1: CLOSED AFGHANISTAN REGIONAL RESPONSE CFP: CLOSED IRAQ CALL FOR PROPOSALS - ROUND 6: CLOSED COLOMBIA CALL FOR PROPOSALS - ROUND 3: CLOSED COLOMBIA CALL FOR PROPOSALS - ROUND 4: CLOSED YEMEN CALL FOR PROPOSALS - ROUND 1: CLOSED NIGERIA CALL FOR PROPOSALS - ROUND 2: CLOSED

 

Explore additional financing opportunities through WPHF’s regular funding cycle, which are advertised here.

The WPHF Funding Initiative on Forced Displacement is linked to BMZ’s Action Network on Forced Displacement. This visionary Network brings together women leaders who are actively engaged on behalf of and together with displaced women. The women leaders of the Action Network are involved in the WPHF Funding Initiative on Forced Displacement by informing the thematic orientation of the Call for Proposals, participating in the selection of countries, preselecting projects for funding, and supporting the women’s organizations receiving funding in terms of knowledge sharing and visibility.

The WPHF Mentorship Scheme strengthens the capacity of civil society organizations working with women and girls in forced displacement

The WPHF Mentorship Scheme mobilizes the expertise of Germany’s Action Network on Forced Displacement to develop capacities and sustainability of WPHF civil society partners of the Funding Window. The WPHF Mentorship Scheme was officially launched at the annual meeting of the Action Network on Forced Displacement in November 2021.

In the framework of the WPHF Global Learning Hub (L-HUB) and the Community of Practice, the WPHF Mentorship Scheme leverages the expertise of the  women leaders of Germany’s Action Network on Forced Displacement, aiming to strengthen the capacity of WPHF-supported civil society partners  through two innovative mentoring modalities:

1. Active engagement in WPHF capacity building webinars

  • Members of the Action Network contribute their knowledge and expertise by providing inputs in WPHF online capacity building webinars designed to build the organizational skills of WPHF civil society partners. For example, by sharing their leadership journeys and their experience in political negotiation.

2. Peer to peer Mentorship Opportunities

  • WPHF-supported CSOs working on forced displacement receive small grants to support each other’s institutional development through joint activities in tandems.
  • Interested members of the Action Network are paired with CSO tandems to provide advice and expertise to support the tandems’ goals and actions, when relevant.

Find more information in the WPHF Mentorship Scheme’s Brief:

doc icon Mentorship Scheme Brief English doc icon MENTORSHIP SCHEME BRIEF Spanish doc icon MENTORSHIP SCHEME BRIEF Arabic

Why Invest in Displaced Women and Girls

At the end of 2019, 79.5 Million people were forced to flee from their homes – the highest number on record by UNHCR. Among them are 26 million refugees, 24.7 Million internally displaced people (IDPs), 4.7 Million asylum seekers, as well as 3.6 Million other displaced people. Women and girls make up around 50 per cent of any refugee or internally displaced population and are among the most vulnerable. Their right to participate in political and economic decision-making is undermined by social, cultural and legal barriers, their lack of familiarity with their new environments, economic deprivation or exclusion as well as physical and emotional violence.

Despite these challenges, many displaced women and girls demonstrate great resilience and leadership. Especially in times of crises, women lead the way by securing the survival of their families and strengthen social cohesion within their communities. Crises can also provide an opportunity to overcome patriarchal gender roles as displaced women and girls take on new responsibilities to overcome their difficult situations. Enabling the participation and leadership of displaced women and girls in socio-economic and political decision-making is a crucial prerequisite to peaceful coexistence and to the prevention and management of migration crises.